Tag Archives: Agriculture

MORE BABIES!!!

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We got our new chicks yesterday.  I’m interested to see how this will play out.  Paul didn’t want new chickens six months ago when I said the hens were broody, now we have mucho.  I think the tally is a whopping 75 head of fluff.  I’m still in the dark as to what the variety of chickens these are, this being addressed to Tabby who is just dying to know…aren’t you.  Tabby, and every one else, they are being kept in the green house at present to keep them warm and such.  Here are some pictures of them arriving.

Everyone was excited.

Doesn’t Karen look happy to be holding a baby chick?!

I told you I’d get a better picture of you Emily!

Did you know chickens were born in a box?

A temporary home.

In other news, Emily, Kyle and I made cultured vegetables for the first time.  We were winging it.  I watched a few YouTube videos and we went for it, but dear reader, it seems to be working.  There are so few directions, so it seems to easy to be true.  I’ll let you know in a few days how they taste.

Here is a picture of them this morning doing their thing.  There is beet, cabbage, kale and collard greens in here.  We also added salt, ground coriander and cayenne pepper.  What a terrible picture!  Too much coffee.

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Buzzy Day Today

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Up with the sun, and we got more accomplished before 9:30am than most.  Early this morning, Paul went up to Lowell Arkansas with a new farm friend Butch Wilson, to pick up a bee hive.  Butch and his wife came to the Slow Foods potluck held here about a month ago and noticed that there was a hive at the back of the farm.  Since he and his wife grow a garden, he said that he couldn’t support what we were doing in that way, but would like to help out in another way.  So, Butch and his wife purchased a bee hive for us, to help pollinate the crops.  Thank you Butch, and your wife, I feel bad that I don’t know her name, for your generous contribution!  Also, a few representatives from the CO-OP, Ozark Natural Foods came by to take our picture to go up on the wall in the produce section of the store, and interview us for their newsletter, or possibly their blog?  I’m not sure, I was in and out of the conversation, but we were interviewed about the operation.  Lastly, about 20 highschool/college engineering students came out for a tour of the farm.  Paul and Jonathan took them around, and with their enthusiasm, I’m sure these folks were wowed.  Then it was lunch time.

 

You Say Goodbye and I Say Hello

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Jason and Eric sailed off into the wild blue yonder today upon the wings of a graceful, black Skylark.  It was interesting dinning alone tonight.  We’ve had house guests since February, it’s lonesome, one gets used to having all that company.  The last set of WWOOF’ers, Courtney and Grace headed west, Eric and Jason be headed east.  Jason wants to see more “southern” farms.  Around the campfire last night he mentioned how he hasn’t heard a single southern accent since he started his trip.  He had been in St. Louis, Springfield, to Patrice’s farm and here.  I respect that he’s trying to find a black owned farm and get the stories of those who stayed opposed to those who escaped to the cities.  I hope you find what you’re looking for.  You were a good worker Jason and Paul’s a little misty you took off, but life goes on and you’re always welcome.

On one of their last days here, Jason and Eric stuccoed the inside of the greenhouse, and it’s almost complete!

Adios Gentlemen!